NCLEX Pharm: Dilantin

Generic name: Phenytoin Sodium. Brand name: Dilantin

Class: Antiepileptic, Anticonvulsant, Antiarrhythmic

Indication: Seizures, Cardiac Arrhythmias

Side effects:

  • Hematology: aplastic anemia, hematopoietic complications,
  • Neuro: ataxia, dizziness, drowsiness, insomnia
  • Skin: purpuric dermatitis, Steven-Johnson syndrome.
  • GI: gingival hyperplasia, liver damage

Nursing Tips:

  • Therapeutic serum level 10-20 mcg/ml
  • Do not stop abruptly, to prevent status epilepticus.
  • Stop if rash, depressed blood count, enlarged lymph nodes, hypersensitivity reaction, signs of liver damage develop.
  • Not for use in pregnancy, it will cause fetal hydantoin syndrome; mental & physical birth defects.
  • Phenytoin is occasionally used in the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias, those associated with digitalis intoxication
  • Continually monitor cardiac rhythm; check BP frequently.
  • Dilantin capsules should be taken by mouth, swallowed whole. Do not open or crush medication.
  • Patient should take medication with a full glass (8 ounces) of water unless the doctor directs otherwise.
  • Dilantin should be used regularly and all doses taken on time to keep the serum level constant.
  • Products that contain calcium (e.g., antacids, calcium supplements) and nutritional tube-feeding products may decrease the absorption of phenytoin. Separate liquid nutritional products at least 1 hour before and 1 hour after phenytoin dose.

To your Success!

Rophem 🙂

Holiday Sales

‘Tis the season of giving 🙂 To bring out the special Christmas spirit and to usher in the new year, we have decided to host a new year sale.

FIRST – Continuing Education Courses are at 15% off for Nurses and Advanced Nurses in the following states: 

  • Florida
  • Georgia
  • South Carolina
  • District of Columbia
  • Arkansas
  • Licensed Midwives.
  • Alabama Nurses*

By using the code SAVE15, you can save when you get the course
package for your respective state, and you will be renewal ready.
Course credits post to CE Broker website within 24 hours.
(*Alabama Board of Nursing accepts CE courses that are approved by other BON within the US, see link for reference – http://www.alabamaadministrativecode.state.al.us/docs/nurs/610-X-10.pdf)

SECOND – Two for the price of One! Rophem NCLEX Review for graduate nurses.

Get your license this New Year 2019 with Rophem and what better way to stay accountable than with a friend. Get one NCLEX review and invite a friend for FREE, or simply split the bill for double the reward! Now you and a friend can do it together – #passNCLEX! Register Now on rophem.com! Seats are limited!
January 7, 8, 9, 10 (Mon to Thur).
January 14, 15, 16, 17 (Mon to Thur) – 9 am each day.

 

Rophem 🙂

New Nurses – First Year Survival Tips

Congratulations!! You have achieved those things that you really wanted – you’ve finished nursing school, passed the NCLEX and now you probably secured your first job as a nurse or you are waiting to get one.  So what’s next, how ready are you for the tasks ahead? There are challenges ahead and most graduates feel overwhelmed and unprepared; as a matter of fact, some new nurses find it hard to keep their first job past their orientation time.

I remember when I finished nursing school, honestly, it was a great achievement to become a nurse but then the reality of this lovely and wonderful profession can be shocking. As a graduate or new nurse, you really do not know everything; yes, you passed every test but you are still learning and now you learn where you work. Note that as a new nurse, you are not expected to have answers to every question. So here are some ideas to help get through your first year as a Nurse.

  • Be Patient: Remember you are still learning, you don’t know everything, and there are some questions you may not be to answer right away. Give yourself time to learn and you will surely get there. The same thing applied to the unit you work, it will take some time for you to know all the policies and get used to the unit in general. So do not be harsh on yourself. If there is anything you don’t know, don’t feel bad because it is okay. Be Patient; take one day at a time.
  • Don’t be afraid to ask: one of those things that will help you to learn is asking questions. This is a sign that you are ready to learn, and that you do not want to make mistakes. Making assumptions when you don’t know what to do will only lead to mistakes. Remember you are a nurse, and that you are taking care of people – mistakes could be bad, so ask questions. Protect your practice.
  • Take care of yourself: this is where you will need to do a head to toe assessment on yourself. Believe me; I do this all the time, even now. Working as a nurse is very demanding and you will be on your feet for longer hours. So it is highly important to look at yourself, assess and plan for the future. You do not want to break down, eat good food, drink adequate amount of fluid exercise and wear comfortable shoes.
  • Don’t take it home: just like the employer does not want you to bring your home to work, don’t take work home either. Things will happen but once you give report to the coming nurse; that is the end of your shift. You need to go home rest your body, eat good food and prepare for another day. And when someone wrongs you on the job, remember no one is perfect; don’t take it home.
  • Be grateful and believe in yourself: you have come a long way, look back at where you started and see where you are now. Take a look at the nursing curriculum that you’ve learned from, all the exams you took and passed, time to be grateful. Not everyone that started finished. Also belief in yourself, you are a professional nurse, you are licensed and authorized to practice. You can do it, with patience and readiness to learn all you can; it will surely come together.

Welcome to the nursing profession!!!